Supporting Classroom Technology and Teachers Practices

Supporting Classroom Technology and Teachers Practices

Summary

With the onset of remote learning due to COVID-19, schools were forced to develop, revise, and implement educational technology practices. Therefore, knowing what the context and aspirations are for the school you are working with is vital. Below are five models frequently used by districts to articulate their vision and beliefs regarding educational tech

It is a commonly held belief that, over time, technology has changed how we “do education.” Just think about how you learned and compare that to the current educational technology landscape. One conclusion your memories may yield is that the only constant (especially when it comes to education) is changing. However, qualifying this truism is essential so that both messaging and support can be clear and compelling.

Supporting Classroom Technology

 

In turn, this article will focus on how your organization can support technology developed in the K-12 classroom and the practices educators use with that technology.

Moreover, if we accept the claim that change is the only constant in education, we must internalize that staying informed about educational technology is essential to our work. Having this disposition at the heart of your organization’s work will ultimately translate into solid partnerships and attractive propositions provided to schools.

One aspect of staying true to our claim above means knowing what informs school decisions about technology use.
With the onset of remote learning due to COVID-19, schools were forced to develop, revise, and implement educational technology practices. Therefore, knowing what the context and aspirations are for the school you are working with is vital. Below are five models frequently used by districts to articulate their vision and beliefs regarding educational technology.

 

  • PICRAT: This model assumes two foundational questions teachers must ask about technology use in their classrooms. (1) What is the student’s relationship to the technology? (PIC: Passive, Interactive, Creative) (2) How does the teacher’s technology influence traditional practice? (RAT: Replace, Amplify, Transform).
  • SAMR: A popular acronym for technology integration (substitution, augmentation, modification, and redefinition). When switching to virtual formats, teachers often focus on the first two levels replacing hard-copy materials with digital ones. SAMR is best used to elevate awareness of the range of tech options for the lesson or unit.
  • Supporting Classroom TechnologyTIM: The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) provides a framework for describing and targeting the use of technology to enhance students’ learning. The TIM incorporates five learning environments: active, collaborative, constructive, authentic, and goal-directed, and five levels of technology integration: entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion, and transformation. Together, the characteristics create a matrix of 25 cells where educators can self-assess their practice.
  • TPACK: This model presents three types of core knowledge educators use daily: content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and technological knowledge. Content knowledge is knowledge of one’s content area, such as science, math, or social studies. Pedagogical knowledge is knowledge of how to teach. And technological knowledge is knowledge of how to use technology tools. These core knowledge domains interact with and build on each other in meaningful and complicated ways.
  • TRIPLE “E”: This framework is designed for educators to measure the extent that technology tools are helping students to (1) engage in, (2) enhance and (3) extend learning goals. The framework is intended to help educators create lessons that allow students to use technology to meet and add value to learning goals as active, social, and creative learners in authentic ways.

 

Of course, there are other technology models schools and districts may use that need to be listed above. I do believe, however, that we are at a point where the vast majority of schools are not promoting technology in the classroom to use it. Regardless, I encourage your team to become familiar with this open resource collection of texts dedicated to general practices and specific content courses.

With this knowledge, you and your team can engage with schools strategically, intelligently, and purposefully. That is a winning combination!

By: Craig Perrier

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